WOODROW WILSON AND AMERICA’S FIRST ATTEMPT AT ESTABLISHING A NEW WORLD ORDER

When:
October 5, 2017 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
2017-10-05T19:00:00+00:00
2017-10-05T20:30:00+00:00
Where:
Morristown High School
50 Early St
Morristown, NJ 07960
USA
Contact:
Karin Ruppel, Great Horizons Program Coordinatoir
973 292 2063, ext 8315

America’s first effort at establishing a new world order on behalf of a troubled world was the vision President Woodrow Wilson put forth at the Versailles Peace Conference in the spring of 1919.  Historians view this as a failed effort because the U.S. did not join the League of Nations after World War I.  This presentation will contend that Wilson did succeed in fostering a new world in Europe that despite World War II and the Cold War is in place today.  A Europe at peace with itself is the result.

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Mon
1:00 pm BATAAN, WHEN MEN HAVE TO DIE – T... @ Monmouth County Library Headquarters
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Contact

For Inquiries
Email: ww2erastudies@gmail.com.
Available for bookings.

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